Brittney Cooper's Eloquent Rage nominated for a Hurston Wright Legacy Award

Jun 25, 2019
The Hurston/Wright Legacy Award TM honors the best in Black literature in the United States and around the globe. Introduced in 2001, the Legacy Award was the first national award presented to Black writers by a national organization of Black writers. Fiction, nonfiction and poetry honorees are selected in a juried competition.

Imani Perry's Looking for Lorraine wins 2019 Lambda Literary Award for LGBTQ nonfiction

Jun 06, 2019

A Starred Kirkus for Imani Perry's Breathe

Jun 05, 2019
Deeply intergenerational, the book blurs intended audiences to call all of us to face up to legacies of injustice while insisting on the grace and conviviality necessary to imagine just futures. A masterfully poetic and intimate work that anchors mothering within the long-standing tradition of black resistance and resourcefulness.

Tanisha Ford's Dressed in Dreams an Essence 10 Best Summer Reads selection

May 21, 2019
Dressed in Dreams: A Black Girl's Love Letter to the Power of Fashion by Tanisha C. Ford

Salamishah Tillet Opinion piece for the New York Times

May 20, 2019
Black Women in Chicago, Getting Things Done How the rest of the country can follow them.

Starred Booklist review for Imani Perry's Breathe

May 14, 2019

This mother’s striking and generous admonition to thrive even in the face of white mendacity also is a meditation on parenting.
 

Imani Perry's Looking for Lorraine wins the Shilts-Grahn award for non-fiction

Apr 26, 2019
The Shilts-Grahn award for nonfiction, which "recognizes the best nonfiction book of the year by or about lesbians, bisexual women, and/or trans women, or that has a significant influence upon the lives of queer women," went to Looking for Lorraine: The Radiant and Radical Life of Lorraine Hansberry by Imani Perry.

A starred Booklist and glowing Kirkus Review for Tanisha Ford's Dressed in Dreams: A Black Girl's Love Letter to the Power of Fashion

Apr 24, 2019
In a narrative that progresses by discrete, chronological chapters, the Tanisha Ford presents a kind of memoir of her life through certain iconic looks that she incorporated over the years, creating through hairstyle, clothes, and accessories a "powerful social skin."

Salamishah Tillet in the New York Times

Apr 15, 2019
Salamishah Tillet is a regular contributor to the New York Times. You can read her articles here.

Why the Highlander Attack Matters

Apr 12, 2019
Robin D.G. Kelley in The Nation
The arson attack on the Highlander Center, a longtime leader in racial and social-justice work, is not merely a hate crime—it’s an act of war.

Nipsey Hussle Loved His Blackness

Apr 12, 2019
Michael Eric Dyson in New York Times
His story is so compelling because love was at the core of his beliefs and behavior.

Grimoire Noir Kirkus Review

Apr 12, 2019

In a magical town, a teen boy seeks his missing sister. Bucolic Blackwell is unlike most other sleepy burgs: Here, girls are the sole possessors of magick, but enchanted boundaries keep them constrained within its limits. When Bucky, a reedy boy sporting a trench coat and fedora, learns his young sister, Heidi, is missing, he is immediately on the case.

Brittney Cooper Discusses How Racial Justice Activism Inspires the Feminist Movement

Apr 11, 2019
Women in the World with over 1 million views
At the 2019 Women in the World Summit, author and associate professor Brittney Cooper explains how America's movements for racial justice lead to feminist uprisings.

Damon Young Is Getting Blacker by the Minute

Apr 10, 2019
WNYC
In a new collection of essays, 
What Doesn’t Kill You Makes You Blacker, Pittsburgh-based writer and co-founder of VerySmartBrothas.com, Damon Young, gets very personal and very black. Here he talks with WNYC’s cultural critic Rebecca Carroll about black masculinity, parenting a black girl in an all-pervasive white supremacist country, and being labeled gay as a young high school teacher.  
 

We Live for the We: A New Book on the Political Power of Black Motherhood

Apr 09, 2019
Black Perspectives
In We Live for the We, first-time mother Dani McClain sets out to understand how to raise her daughter in what she, as a Black woman, knows to be an unjust–even hostile–society. 

As Goes the South, so Goes the Nation

Apr 03, 2019
Imani Perry
Harper's
History haunts, but Alabama changes
 

What Civil Rights History Can Teach Kavanaugh’s Critics

Apr 02, 2019
Blair Kelley
The New York Times
A week after the justice’s controversial swearing-in, the African-American activists I study offer a lesson to those who are in despair: Failure is part of the process.

How We Fight White Supremacy Reminds Us That ‘We’ Have the Power

Apr 01, 2019
Akiba Solomon and Kenrya Rankin
The Root
 

We Forgot What Dr. King Believed In

Mar 31, 2019
Michael Eric Dyson
New York Times
In June 1966, less than two years before he was killed, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. preached from his Atlanta pulpit of the dynamic dance between Good Friday and Easter, between death and resurrection, between despair and hope.

Brittney Cooper: How Has Time Been Stolen From People Of Color?

Mar 29, 2019